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Enhancing diabetes, hypertension, breast cancers and TB screening and treatment services in Tanzania

Active Since: 2015

Contributing to SDGs…

Enhancing diabetes, hypertension, breast cancers and TB screening and treatment services in Tanzania

PARTNER ORGANISATIONS

  • Hospitals/Health Facilities

    St. Kizito hospital (SKH)

  • Local NGOs

    CUAMM Tanzania

Objectives

  • To contribute to the reduction of the burden of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) through prevention and treatment in Kilosa district, Morogoro Region in Tanzania”. (SDG target number 3 and 4)

What are the health needs and challenges?

High burden of Non-communicable diseases in Tanzania due to low early detection rate and low capacity of screening and treatment services.

Partnership activities and how they address needs and challenges

Bristol-Myer Squib Foundation
Funding support and Technical Assistance

  • Kizito hospital: Ensured treatment services for diabetes, hypertension, breast cancers and TB plus strengthen the cervical cancer services in St. Kizito Hospital, Mikumi: ensured provision of drugs and therapy for diabetes, hypertension, breast cancer and TB care. Working with Council Health Management team to ensure availability of screening and treatment services in Kilosa district.
  • CUAMM Tanzania: To increase awareness in the community and provide screening activities for the community.

SDGs THE PARTNERSHIP CONTRIBUTES TO

SDG 3: Good Health and Wellbeing

  1. 3.1: Reduce Maternal Mortality
  2. 3.2: Reduce Under-5 Mortality 
  3. 3.3: Communicable Diseases & NTDs
  4. 3.4: NCDs (including mental health)
  5. 3.7: Access to sexual and reproductive health-care services 

SDG 17: Partnerships for the Goals 

RESULTS & MILESTONES

Increased awareness on non communicable disease, established screening and treatment of non communicable diseases and reduced complications and death due to non communicable diseases in Kilosa district.

Estimated overall value of partnership: $496,047 Estimated amount of people impacted: 612,859